Rising Insecurity In Nigeria: Causes And Solutions.

Insecurity is simply defined as uncertainty or anxiety about oneself. The primary responsibility of every government is to protect the lives and properties of its people. This is entrenched in the 1999 constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria section 14(b) that, “the security and welfare of the people shall be the primary purpose of government”.

Prevailing situations like kidnapping, terrorism, communal crisis, sovereignty agitation, farmer’s-herder’s clashes and Islamic movement of Nigeria riots portrays that the government has failed in executing its primary responsibility.

It is also alarming that national security threat keeps increasing in various forms and dimensions, yet there seems to be no proper measures to put an end to it.

In 2019, the federal government budgeted 1.76 trillion naira for national security and 1.81 trillion naira in 2020. This seems to be grossly insufficient in tackling the security issues bedeviling the nation.

Insecurity is a global challenge. One will wonder why a country like United States, despite its sophisticated military apparatus, still faces security threat.

No amount of security meetings, money spent on arms and ammunition, local or international support can bring about our desired results if the causes of insecurity are not addressed.

Affirmatively, security is everyone’s responsibility; government officials, royal and religious leaders, academia and citizens must participate in tackling this insecurity.

There are many controversies regarding the underlying causes of our national insecurity. Most scholars argue it to be vastly political, while others point to the high rate of unemployment and other situational issues.

These arguments are not far from the facts as they highlight different parts of the same problem. There are seven major causal factors of our national insecurity, namely; high unemployment and poverty rates, porosity of borders, ethno-religious intolerance, lack of education, corruption amidst security personnel, uneven distribution of scarce national resources and political appointment, and injustice to victims. These factors are discussed below:

High rate of poverty and unemployment: In 2019, the unemployment rate in Nigeria stood at 23.1% and underemployment at 16.6%, as given by the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS). Also, Nigeria was tagged as the poverty headquarters in the global poverty ranking. Poverty and unemployment leads to frustration and desperation among the youths who now resort to kidnapping and other criminal activities for survival. It a popular saying that an idle mind is the devil’s workshop and an idle mind is gullible and highly vulnerable to crime.

Porosity of borders: Nigeria borders are terribly porous. The influx of strangers, arms and ammunition has contributed largely to our insecurity. Adding to this ordeal, there are no good records of Nigerian citizens; as such, the Nigerien, Chadian, Benin Republican, Cameroonian or Togolese can claim to be from Kano, Sokoto, Ogun, Cross River or Kwara states respectively. It has also been verified that most of the criminals are foreigners who are fond of indulging in criminal activities and escaping to their various countries through our porous borders.

Ethno-religious intolerance: Since independence, Nigeria has been bedeviled with ethno-religious conflicts caused by allegations of oppression, intimidation, marginalization, and widespread nepotism. Major riots, communal crisis and insurgencies are of ethno-religious origins. This includes the Kaduna (Zangon kataf, Sharia and Mrs World) riots, Shagamu riots, Maitastine riot, Offa-Erin riots, Jukun and Tivs riot and the unending Boko-Haram insurgency. However, religious and political leaders are the oxygen fueling these crises with their inciting statements and harsh response to unverified rumours.

Lack of education: Major field players of criminal and other heinous acts in Nigeria are reportedly illiterates. Northern states like Kaduna, Kano, Niger and Nasarawa states have come to see the need to implement, encourage and inculcate western education in the lives of its youths and children/teenagers, thus demolishing archaic beliefs that hinder education.

Corruption amidst security personnels: A large number of Nigerians have lost faith in our security agents. It is believed that one-third (1/3) of Nigerians believe that the security personnels give backups to these criminals earlier mentioned.

Also, the miscreant behaviours of some security personnels are disheartening, as collection of brown envelopes, extorting motorists, victimization and other corrupt vices become the code of conduct of some unpatriotic security personnels.

Uneven distribution of scarce national resources and political appointment: Most Nigerians, especially the southern region perceive that the federal government is being bias and imbalanced in its resource allocation and also political appointments. This has led to the establishment of ethnic agitative bodies such as; Niger Delta Avengers, Indigenous People of Biafra (IPOB), Movement for the Actualization of the Sovereign state of Biafra (MASSOB), etc.

Injustice: Injustice and lack of support to the victims of previous attacks and victims of natural disasters have also contributed to our national insecurity. Victims of previous attacks are probably forced out of their various houses and communities with their oppressors unapprehended. This makes most victims to take the law into their hands thereby resorting to retaliation that results to more attacks.

SOLUTIONS
From the aforementioned causes of insecurity in Nigeria, it is extremely important to note that lack of unity and trust is an impediment to finding solutions to the insecurity problem. In this case, solutions to insecurity requires good leadership and governance, promotion of national unity and regaining populace trust. Regaining the trust of the populace should be a top priority to our leaders. Our religious, community and political leaders need to caution their words and actions as it contribute largely to our country’s stability.

We need to eliminate corruption, strengthen border patrols, provide employment based on merit and not based on connections or political affiliation; we need to speed up the rate of socio-economic and infrastructural development. In addition, Citizens should be enlighten to be conscious of their environment and report any suspicious movements and lawless activities to the security agents, and their anonymity been ensured.

There should be active national and state security intelligence gatherings that will enhance security strategy. The federal government should support community policing to encourage prompt response to crime. There is also the need to sophisticate the operational equipment used by security agencies.

For the goodwill of our only dear country, Nigeria.

By: Abdullateef Lawal,
Country Director,
Global Youth Network

Published by: Ebenezer Otu Sackey,

Remembering Komla Dumor, an African broadcaster of exceptional quality

Komla Dumor 

When Ghanaian broadcaster Komla Afeke Dumor began his broadcasting career with Ghanaian-based radio station Joy FM, his quality shone so bright that he was entrusted with hosting the morning show. Under his captainship, he earned numerous awards including the converted Journalist of the Year prize. Soon enough, global broadcaster BBC came calling so “in 2006 Dumor joined the BBC African Service in London as host of the radio programme Network Africa. From 2008 to 2012 he presented The World Today on the BBC World Service. In 2011 Dumor began presenting the World News and Africa Business Report on BBC World News and early mornings on BBC One and the BBC News Channel. When the latter was relaunched in 2013, fellow BBC correspondent Lerato Mbele was chosen as host.

Image result for where is komla dumor's body buried

“In December 2013, he was named as one of the 100 most influential Africans of 2013 by New African magazine, with the citation: “It has been a coming of age for Kumla Dumor this year. The presenter of Focus on Africa, the BBC’s flagship and first-ever dedicated daily TV news programme in English for African audiences, broadcast on BBC World News, has established himself as one of the emerging African faces of global broadcasting. As a lead presenter for BBC World, Dumor has considerable influence on how the continent is covered.”

In Komla Dumor, Ghana had a powerful voice at the highest level. His professionalism, poise, intelligence and skill coupled with his ever ready smile meant he was a thoroughbred yet affable. Little wonder then that at the time of his death at 41, Dumor was the only West African newsreader on BBC World News.

Requiem mass at the Roman Catholic cathedral in Accra for BBC presenter Komla Dumor on February 21, 2014
Requiem mass at the Roman Catholic cathedral in Accra for BBC presenter Komla Dumor on February 21, 2014

But we all go the way of mortals so on January 18, 2014 in his London home, Dumor died after a cardiac arrest, having been on air the day before. His death stunned the news world as well as his fellow country men and women who couldn’t come to terms that a seemingly healthy Dumor was indeed gone.

The tributes came in thick and fast. Ghanaian president at the time John Mahama stated via Twitter that Dumor was one of Ghana’s “finest ambassadors” and “was a broadcaster of exceptional quality and Ghana’s gift to the World.”

“Komla developed his own unique on air style, seamlessly moved between TV and radio and influenced Africa coverage across the BBC,” BBC News presenter Mishal Husain submitted.

“A leading light of African journalism – committed to telling the story of Africa as it really is,” is how BBC’s global news director Peter Horrocks remembered him.

Komla Dumor launched Africa Business Report on the BBC World News Channel in 2009
Komla Dumor launched Africa Business Report on the BBC World News Channel in 2009

Dumor’s sure hands and voice assuaged any fears his editors may have had. He interviewed notables including deceased UN captain Kofi Annan, billionaire Bill Gates and great writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

Mega events he covered include Barack Obama’s trip to Africa, funeral of Nelson Mandela and the 2010 World Cup in South Africa.

For one who started out studying pre-clinical medicine at the University of Jos in Nigeria before  graduating with a BSc. in Sociology and Psychology from the University of Ghana and earning a Master’s of Public Administration from Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, his ascent to the pinnacle of journalism and broadcasting was unconventionally swift. Dumor left behind wife, Kwansema Quansah with whom he had three children.

His body was returned to Ghana on February 3, 2014. His remains were interred close to his mother at their family house.

Dumor, left, with Mo Ibrahim, the chairman of the Mo Ibrahim Foundation, in Ethiopia last November [AP]
Dumor, left, with Mo Ibrahim, the chairman of the Mo Ibrahim Foundation, in Ethiopia last November [AP]

Months after his death in 2015, the BBC launched the BBC World News Komla Dumor Award, presented each year “to an outstanding individual living and working in Africa, who combines strong journalism skills, on air flair, and an exceptional talent in telling African stories with the ambition and potential to become a star of the future.”

The award was presented to Ugandan journalist Nancy Kacungira in 2015, Nigerian journalist Didi Akinyelure in 2016, Nigerian journalist Amina Yuguda in 2017, Kenyan journalist Wahiga Mwaura in 2018 and Ugandan journalist Solomon Serwanjja in 2019. The winner is given a three-month training and development contract in BBC News.

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) simplified. What are they?

OVERVIEW

Also referred to as Global Goals, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are a set of 17 developmental goals that emanated from a United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development in Rio de Janeiro in 2012. It was approved and adopted by all the United Nations Member States in 2015 as a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure peace and prosperity for all by 2030. The SDGs come in as a replacement for the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which commenced a global effort in 2000 to deal with the indignity of poverty and hunger, preventing fatal diseases, and widening primary education to all children, as well as other development priorities. These 17 goals that constitute the SDGs are:

The SDGs.

GOAL 1. No Poverty:

It is a target of the United Nations to ensure that extreme poverty is eradicated among all people [living on less than $1.25 a day] everywhere. The goal is to end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture by 2030. With some disabilities identified to be linked with poverty leading to malnutrition, poor healthcare and dangerous living conditions, this goal is expected to also help reduce disabilities among people.

GOAL 2. Zero Hunger:

By 2030, hunger is expected to be ended among, in particular, the poor and people in vulnerable conditions, including infants. The goal targets availability of safe, nutritious and sufficient food through sustainable improved agriculture and other food production systems. Ending hunger, achieving food security and improved nutrition and promoting sustainable agriculture is therefore the core of this goal.

GOAL 3. Good Health and Well-being:

The target of this goal is to reduce mortality, especially maternal and premature mortality among people, and also to achieve a universal access to good healthcare service. It aims at strengthening the prevention and treatment of all forms of substance abuse, as well as ending epidemics of AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, tropical diseases, and other communicable diseases.

GOAL 4. Quality Education:

The Goal 4 of the SDGs aims at ensuring inclusive and equitable quality education and promoting lifelong learning opportunities for all. This includes technical and vocational training for people.

GOAL 5. Gender Equality:

The core of this goal is to achieve gender equality and to empower all women and girls to play active roles in their society. It also seeks to end all forms of violence and discrimination against all women and girls everywhere.

GOAL 6. Clean Water and Sanitation:

The target of this goal is to achieve an equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all everywhere. It is to ensure the availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation.

GOAL 7. Affordable and Clean Energy:

The target of this goal is to ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all. This is also to ensure that, by 2030, energy used is safe for life on the planet.

GOAL 8. Decent Work and Economic Growth:

This goal is targeted at promoting sustained, inclusive and sustainable per capita economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all. The goal, thus, is to ensure a simultaneous improvement in both the economy and lives of people in the economy.

GOAL 9. Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure:

The SDG 9 aims to, by 2030, build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization, including regional and transborder infrastructure, and foster innovation to support economic development and human well-being, with a focus on affordable and equitable access for all.

GOAL 10. Reduced Inequality:

By 2030, this goal seeks to progressively achieve and sustain income growth of the bottom 40 per cent of the population at a rate higher than the national average. Thus, the focus of this goal is to reduce inequality within and among countries.

GOAL 11. Sustainable Cities and Communities:

It is a target of the SGDs to make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable. The goal here is to ensure universal access to adequate, safe and affordable housing and basic services, and to upgrade slums.

GOAL 12. Responsible Consumption and Production:

The 12th goal on the list of SDGs is to ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns. The SDGs, by 2030, aims to achieve a sustainable management and efficient use of natural resources, which includes avoiding wastage of resources.

GOAL 13. Climate Action:

Through policies, education or awareness creation, and the strengthening of resistance and adaptive capacity to climate related dangers, the goal 13 of the SDGs aims at establishing urgent actions to combat climate change and its impacts.

GOAL 14. Life Below Water:

The target here is to provide protection for aquatic life and habitat through policies and environmental protection mechanisms. This goal is meant to conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development.

GOAL 15. Life on Land:

With this goal, the SDGs seeks to protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and stop and reverse land degradation and also halt biodiversity loss.

GOAL 16. Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions:

In the absence of peace and justice, the realization of the above goals cannot see the participation of individuals. Therefore, promoting peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, providing access to justice for all and building effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels are what this goal seeks to achieve by 2030.

GOAL 17. Partnership to Achieve the Goals:

The realization of the SDGs can only be possible under strong global partnerships and cooperation, considering the inequality in global economies and resources of nations. According to the UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), achieving the SDGs will require US$5 trillion to $7 trillion in annual global investment, and this as well justifies the need for partnership for the goals. So, through the pledge to “Leave No One Behind,” countries are committed to fast-track progress for those furthest behind first. And this is the 17th goal among the SDGs.

CONCLUSION

Clearly, these goal, if realized, will make our planet a better place to live on than it is today. And to achieve these goals, everyone needs to get involved. Everyone’s creativity, knowhow, financial resources and technology is needed for the realization of the SDGs.

Published by:

Ebenezer Otu Sackey, volunteer at GYN

World Innovation Summit for Education (WISE) AWARDS 2020 – Apply Now To Stand A Chance To Win US$20,000

Since 2009, WISE has received more than 3,000 applications from over 150 countries. Today, 66 projects have been awarded, from a wide variety of sectors and locations for their innovation, positive contribution and ability to adapt to changing trends in the society.

The Awards highlight initiatives found to be most creative and effective in finding solutions to education challenges at any level and in all environments. In bringing forward these models, WISE is helping build a network of recognized change-makers to inspire transformation and innovation in education.

Each year, the WISE Awards recognizes and promotes six innovative projects that address global education challenges and transforming communities. The selected projects are models of excellence that serve as an inspiration for others to improve education through innovation and creative action.

 

Each WISE Awards winning project will receive US$20,000 and will benefit from increased public interest through media exposure and other channels. The WISE Awards is not a grant scheme aimed at supporting projects, nor is it intended to be a source of funding for new and untried ideas. Any such applications or nominations will not be considered.

 

The WISE Awards recognize innovative educational projects that have already demonstrated a transformative impact on individuals, communities, and society.

  • The ideal project would be an ongoing, innovative and impactful education initiative that:
  • Has an excellent record of proven success
  • Is financially sustainable
  • Has a clear plan indicating the project’s future objectives and future development
  • Is scalable
  • Is replicable in other contexts and regions of the world
  • Has a clear understanding and knowledge of:
    – its innovative nature;
    – its distinctiveness within its sphere of action, and;
    – the type and depth of its impact on its beneficiaries.

Location:

Qatar

 Benefits

  • Each WISE Awards winning project will receive US$20,000 and will benefit from increased public interest through media exposure and other channels.
  • The WISE Awards is not a grant scheme aimed at supporting projects, nor is it intended to be a source of funding for new and untried ideas. Any such applications or nominations will not be considered.

 Eligibilities

  • The 2020 WISE Awards submission procedure accepts both applications and nominations.
  • Ongoing/existing education projects run by any type of organization such as colleges, universities, academic networks, schools consortia, civil society and community organizations, governments, international agencies and private-sector companies working in the field of education are invited to apply or nominate.
  • Projects can also belong to any education sector such as pre-primary, primary, secondary, tertiary, vocational training, higher education, special needs education, education for people with disabilities, informal learning, and distance-based, non-formal and lifelong learning.
  • Finally, projects from any part of the world can apply or be nominated for the WISE Awards.
  • Anyone who has submitted a previous application to the WISE Awards can submit a new application for the same – or for a different – project.
  • Previous recipients of the WISE Awards are not eligible to apply for the 200 WISE Awards. Moreover, others involved in the projects and/or activities that have received previous WISE Awards are not eligible to apply on behalf of the same project or activity.

Eligible Regions: Open for all.

Application Process

In order for the application/nomination form to be eligible, your submission must:

  • Be entered into the official form on the online system (curriculum vitae or other forms of documents will not be considered)
  • Be complete and accurate
  • Be submitted in English
  • Be submitted online by the official deadline
  • In the case of an application, the form must include the contact details of two supporters (e.g. former donors, local governments, other NGOs, etc.)

Application Deadline: January 20, 2020 (3 Days Remaining)

CLICK here to APPLY NOW 

 

 For Further Queries

Contact at awards@wise.org.qa